About the new test

Information for participants about how the new Cervical Screening Test is done and who should have the test.

Page last updated: 21 November 2017 (this page is generated automatically and reflects updates to other content within the website)

What is the Cervical Screening Test?
Why has screening changed from 2 to 5 years?
How is the new test more accurate?
How is the Cervical Screening Test done?
Who should have the test?
Why has the age changed from 18 to 25 years for the first test screening test?

What is the Cervical Screening Test?

The Cervical Screening Test is a quick and simple procedure to check the health of your cervix.

The Cervical Screening Test replaces the two-yearly Pap test for people. If you're aged 25 to 74 you should have your first Cervical Screening Test two years after your last Pap test.

The Cervical Screening Test will look and feel the same as the Pap test.

The Pap test looked for cell changes in the cervix, whereas the Cervical Screening Test looks for the human papillomavirus (known as HPV) which can lead to cell changes in the cervix (see diagram of the cervix below).

HPV is a common virus that can cause changes to cells in your cervix, which in rare cases can develop into cervical cancer.

Once you have had your first Cervical Screening Test, you will only need to have one every five years instead of every two, if your results are clear.



Why has screening changed from 2 to 5 years?

The Cervical Screening Test is more accurate at detecting early stage HPV. The Pap test used to look for cell changes in the cervix, whereas the new Cervical Screening Test looks for the HPV which can lead to cell changes in the cervix.

Because of this, it is safe for you if your test does not indicate (show) you have a HPV infection to wait five years between tests. Even if your test shows you have HPV it usually takes 10 or more years for HPV to develop into cervical cancer and cervical cancer is a rare outcome of a HPV infection.

How is the new test more accurate?

Although the Cervical Screening Test will feel the same for you, it is more accurate at detecting early stage human papillomavirus (known as HPV).

HPV is a common virus that can cause changes to cells in your cervix, which in rare cases can develop into cervical cancer. By detecting a HPV infection early, it allows your healthcare provider to monitor the infection and intervene if there are any changes to cells in your cervix.

How is the Cervical Screening Test done?

The test is a quick and simple procedure to check the health of your cervix. Your cervix is the opening of the uterus (neck of the womb), and is at the top of your vagina.

If you have ever had a Pap test before, the way your healthcare provider does the Cervical Screening Test will look and feel the same.

The procedure might be a bit uncomfortable, but it shouldn’t hurt. If you experience pain, tell your healthcare provider straight away.

Remember, you can always ask for a female clinician.

Who should have the test?

If you are 25 to 74 years old and have had a Pap test, you should have your first Cervical Screening Test two years after your last Pap test.

If you are turning 25 years old, or have never had a Pap test before, you should make an appointment with your healthcare provider to have a Cervical Screening Test.

If you have symptoms at any age, such as abnormal vaginal bleeding, pain or discharge, you should discuss these with your healthcare provider immediately.

Why has the age changed from 18 to 25 years for the first test screening test?

Cervical cancer is rare in those under 25 years of age. Since screening began in 1991 it has not reduced the number of people who get cervical cancer in this age group.

The HPV vaccination has reduced the number of people who get cervical cancer in this age group.

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